php exception code

In PHP, an exception is a way to handle runtime errors in a structured way. Exceptions are objects that represent an error that occurred during the execution of a script.

To throw an exception in PHP, you can use the throw keyword followed by an instance of the Exception class or a child class of Exception. Here’s an example:

<?php
// Throw an exception with a custom message
throw new Exception("An error occurred");

// Throw an exception with a custom code and message
throw new Exception("An error occurred", 123);

To catch an exception, you can use a try block followed by a catch block. The try block contains the code that may throw an exception, and the catch block contains the code that handles the exception.

Here’s an example of how to catch an exception in PHP:

<?php
try {
    // Code that may throw an exception
} catch (Exception $e) {
    // Code to handle the exception
}

In the catch block, you can access the exception object using the $e variable. You can use the getMessage method of the exception object to get the error message, and the getCode method to get the error code.

<?php
try {
    // Code that may throw an exception
} catch (Exception $e) {
    // Print the error message
    echo $e->getMessage();
    
    // Print the error code
    echo $e->getCode();
}

You can also use multiple catch blocks to handle different types of exceptions. For example:

<?php
try {
    // Code that may throw an exception
} catch (MyCustomException $e) {
    // Code to handle MyCustomException
} catch (Exception $e) {
    // Code to handle other exceptions
}

In this case, the catch block for MyCustomException will be executed if an instance of MyCustomException is thrown, and the catch block for Exception will be executed for all other exceptions.

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